Zions National Park: Zion National Park in Utah … is Spectacular! Zion is often said to be the most beautiful place in America. “Spectacular” is uttered time and time again as eyes raise to view the vast monoliths of the best of Utah’s National Parks. Zion National Park unveils its eight layers of sandstone, displaying what has taken two-hundred-million years to carve and mold. This spectacular corner of Utah is a masterpiece of towering cliffs, deep red canyons, mesas, buttes and massive monoliths. read more

Bryce Canyon: Bryce Canyon, famous for its worldly unique geology, consists of a series of horseshoe-shaped amphitheaters carved from the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. The erosional force of frost-wedging and the dissolving power of rainwater have shaped the colorful limestone rock of the Claron Formation into bizarre shapes, including slot canyons, windows, fins, and spires called “hoodoos”. read more

Fremont Indian State Park: Discover artifacts, petroglyphs, and pictographs left behind by the Fremont Indians. During construction of Interstate 70, the largest known Fremont Indian village was uncovered. This museum preserves treasures from the site, including pottery, baskets, and arrowheads. Spend a day at the museum, and then camp at nearby Castle Rock Campground. read more

Cove Fort: Built in 1867, Cove Fort was constructed as a safe stop for travelers, where they could find shelter, fresh water, and feed for livestock. Go back in time to the days when travel was by horseback and covered wagon and discover what sort of accommodations a traveler could have expected. read more

Fish Lake National Forest: The Fishlake National Forest in central Utah features majestic stands of aspen encircling open mountain meadows that are lush with a diverse community of forbs and grasses. Fish Lake, from which the forest takes its name, is considered by many to be the gem of Utah. read more

Big Rock Candy Mountain: TYou may recognize this chorus from the folk song, “Big Rock Candy Mountain,” attributed to Harry “Haywire Mac” McClintock and made famous in a 1950s recording by Burl Ives. Shortly after the release of the song in 1928, some local residents, as a joke, placed a sign at the base of a colorful mountain in Utah naming it “Big Rock Candy Mountain.” They also placed a sign next to a nearby spring proclaiming it ‘Lemonade Springs.’ These names stuck, and the mythical Big Rock Candy Mountain of the song became perhaps one of the most recognized geologic sites in west-central Utah. read more

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